Temperatures Russia and Central Asia All temperatures shown are average (Centigrade). For a temperature converter see bottom of page.

Main Russian Travel Page

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

DESTINATION

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

High

Low

Alma-Ata

-2

-6

1

-3

6

-2

16

7

23

15

27

17

32

22

31

20

25

14

13

2

4

-5

-2

-9

Bratsk

-16

-26

-12

-25

-3

-16

6

-6

13

1

20

7

22

10

20

9

14

2

5

-6

-6

-16

-15

-11

Bukhara

-1

-4

3

-2

6

-1

16

7

23

15

27

17

32

22

31

20

25

14

13

2

4

-5

-2

-9

Dushanbe

-6

-13

-4

-13

3

-6

16

7

23

15

27

17

32

22

31

20

25

14

10

1

3

-6

-2

10

Irkutsk

-16

-26

-12

-25

-3

-16

6

-6

13

1

20

7

22

10

20

9

14

2

5

-6

-6

-16

-15

-11

Khabarovsk

-18

-25

-14

-22

-5

-14

5

-2

14

6

20

13

24

17

24

17

17

10

9

1

-5

-11

-16

-22

Kiev

-5

-10

-2

-7

2

-2

13

5

20

11

24

14

25

15

24

14

20

10

13

5

5

0

-1

-5

Kishinev

8

-18

10

-16

18

-10

25

-1

30

5

32

9

33

11

33

10

30

4

25

-1

19

-6

11

-13

Lvov

-2

-7

0

-5

3

-1

13

4

19

8

22

12

23

13

22

12

19

9

14

5

7

1

-1

-5

Moscow

-9

-15

-5

-13

0

-7

10

2

19

8

21

11

22

13

22

12

16

8

9

3

1

-3

-4

-9

Novosibirsk

-16

-26

-12

-25

-3

-16

6

-6

13

1

20

7

22

10

20

9

14

2

5

-6

-6

-16

-15

-21

Odessa

0

-4

2

-2

5

0

12

6

19

12

24

16

26

18

26

17

21

14

16

9

10

5

4

-1

Riga

-2

-8

-1

-7

2

-5

10

2

16

6

21

10

22

12

21

11

17

8

11

5

4

0

-1

-6

Samarkand

1

-8

3

-2

6

-1

16

7

23

15

29

19

35

20

34

19

27

14

13

2

4

-5

-2

-9

St Petersburg

-6

-12

-5

-11

0

-7

8

1

15

6

20

11

21

13

20

12

15

9

9

4

2

-2

-3

-7

Suzdal

-9

-15

-5

-13

0

-7

10

2

19

8

21

11

22

13

22

12

16

8

9

3

1

-3

-4

-9

Tashkent

3

-6

7

-2

12

3

18

8

25

13

31

20

35

22

33

21

27

14

18

5

12

2

7

-2

Tbilisi

7

-1

8

0

13

3

18

8

24

13

28

16

30

20

30

19

25

15

20

9

14

5

9

1

Ulan-Ude

-16

-26

-12

-25

-3

-16

6

-6

13

1

20

7

22

10

20

9

14

2

5

-6

-6

-16

-15

-11

Uzhgorod

-1

-8

2

-4

7

0

16

6

21

10

25

13

26

14

25

14

22

11

16

5

10

3

1

-4

Yalta

3

-1

5

0

8

1

15

5

21

10

25

14

28

16

28

16

23

12

17

8

12

4

7

1

Yaroslavl

-9

-15

-5

-13

0

-7

10

2

19

8

21

11

22

13

22

12

16

8

9

3

1

-3

-4

-9

Zagorsk

-9

-15

-5

-13

0

-7

10

2

19

8

21

11

22

13

22

12

16

8

9

3

1

-3

-4

-9


 

Clothing for Travel in Winter

If you are making a journey across Russia in winter you need a little more planning with your wardrobe. Some will go out and buy a complete set of new winter gear and be done with it, others will plan to use what they have and purchase one, or two new items to ensure their comfort.

What you already have, that could be sued, will depend on what sort of climatic zone you actually live in. Using Melbourne as an example - a colder climate area of Australia. If you have good thermal underwear, gloves and a winter hat/ski beanie you can add these to your existing winter wardrobe and enjoy a Russian winter.

You do need a good wind and waterproof jacket, preferably padded. Footwear – see next paragraph is very important.

Boots or Valenki
A picture taken while wearing valenki boots (warm felt boots that are a popular souvenirs) and an ushanka hat (fur or felt hat with ear-flaps) against the background of the Kremlin is perfect for your Facebook profile picture, but these boots are not such a good idea for walking around the city. Snow removal salt line many of the roads of Russian cities in winter, so for long walks you should wear solid waterproof boots with thick soles. However, if you go to the Russian countryside, valenki are truly wonderful companions for making your way through powdery snow. There are many modern day boots (must be well waterproofed) that will ensued you survive a winter experience. Most important is the sole, try to ensure it has a good grip for winter snow and ice. This writer has a pair of Sorel Boots he got to survive a winter in Canada, many moons ago. They have walked the streets of Russia in winter as well and are the ideal boot. You can also use them in Antarctica if you ever get to go there! The soles have a graphite compound incorporated into the moulding and consequently they have enhanced grip on ice and snow – similar technology to ‘winter tyres’ for cars.

Ushanka Hats are shunned by most younger Russians who prefer more fashionable attire. However, this writer can assure you that they work VERY well!

Thermos with tea or vodka
It' is a myth that Russians keep themselves warm in winter by drinking vodka. For many Russians the best way to stay warm outside is to take a thermos filled with hot tea. This device is ideal for travels around Russia. The thermos became the Soviet travelers best friend due to its ability to preserve heat for up to five hours. Climbers on Mt Everest also have a thermos of hot tea waiting for them when the descend from the summit to the last campsite, so it really does work! 

A hat or a hood
The answer is obvious. Also, it is well known that the head is the part of the body that releases the most of your body heat. Put on everything you have! A hat, a hood, your gloves and don’t forget warm socks. Get ready for the cold, but don't forget to look at the weather forecast. Winter in Russia is unpredictable.

Scarf
Don’t leave home without one!!

 
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